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Mark Crispin Miller is a Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. He is the author of several books, including Boxed In: The Culture of TV (1988)The Bush Dyslexicon: Observations on a National Disorder (2001),  Cruel and Unusual: Bush/Cheney’s New World Order (2004), and Fooled Again: The Real Case for Electoral Reform (2007). He is also the editor of Seeing Through Movies (1990), and Loser Take All: Election Fraud and the Subversion of Democracy, 2000-2008 (2008). He is currently at work on The Marlboro Man: An American Success Story, which will be published in 2021. 

Miller’s essays and articles have appeared in many journals, magazines and newspapers throughout the nation and the world, and he has given countless interviews worldwide, appearing in many documentaries, including Consuming Images (1989),  The Merchants of Cool (2001), Orwell Rolls in His Grave (2003) and The True Cost (2015).

Miller is the editor of Forbidden Bookshelf, an e-book series that revives important works now out of print, most of which were variously killed at birth. Earlier he was the editor of two book series: Discovering America, published by the University of Texas Press, and, prior to that, Icons of America, published by Yale University Press.

In 2004, Miller wrote Patriot Act, a show that he performed for six weeks at the New York Theater Workshop. He is currently co-producing Four Died Trying, a documentary series on the assassinations of JFK, Malcolm X, Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr.

A recipient of fellowships from the Rockefeller, Ingram Merrill and Guggenheim Foundations, Miller is on the board of the Organisation for Propaganda Studies, an international consortium of scholars, and the Alliance for Human Research Protection, whose goal is to prevent, or correct, violations of informed consent in medical research.

Miller earned his bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University in 1971, and his doctorate in English from Johns Hopkins University in 1977. Although he specialized in Renaissance literature, Miller is best known as a media critic. Before joining New York University, Miller served as director of film studies at Johns Hopkins University.