GM crops = superweeds, food insecurity, more pesticides

GM crops promote superweeds, food insecurity and pesticides, say NGOs
Report finds genetically modified crops fail to increase yields let alone solve hunger, soil erosion and chemical-use issues
John Vidal, environment editor
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 19 October 2011 11.53 EDT

Genetic engineering has failed to increase the yield of any food crop but has vastly increased the use of chemicals and the growth of “superweeds”, according to a report by 20 Indian, south-east Asian, African and Latin American food and conservation groups representing millions of people.

The so-called miracle crops, which were first sold in the US about 20 years ago and which are now grown in 29 countries on about 1.5bn hectares (3.7bn acres) of land, have been billed as potential solutions to food crises, climate change and soil erosion, but the assessment finds that they have not lived up to their promises.

The report claims that hunger has reached “epic proportions” since the technology was developed. Besides this, only two GM “traits” have been developed on any significant scale, despite investments of tens of billions of dollars, and benefits such as drought resistance and salt tolerance have yet to materialise on any scale.

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1 thought on “GM crops = superweeds, food insecurity, more pesticides”

  1. The world-wide deregulation of gmo labeling requirements would open up free trade of these genetically engineered and modified foods particularly to the European countries. In 1998, the United States exported $63 million worth of maize to the EU, but the exports decreased to $12.5 million in 2002.

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