Hands off America’s rainforest!

Tell Congress to to oppose the Sealaska “Sweetheart Deal.”
America’s rainforest, the Tongass National Forest, is stunningly beautiful, stretching across islands, fjords and mainland that are part of Southeast Alaska.
In this mist-shrouded forest, black and brown bears grow fat on five different species of Pacific salmon. Bald eagles soar high above waters where sea otters and whales splash.
But new legislation working its way through Congress would transfer much of the ancient forest remaining on the Tongass to Sealaska Corporation for industrial clearcut logging and other private development.
Sealaska Corporation has already clearcut some 300,000 acres of the best and biggest trees on the Tongass, exporting the timber to international markets. They mustn’t be allowed to take the best of what remains. Take action to stop this legislation.
The Tongass must be protected for its ecological values and to help local communities transition to a more sustainable forest economy. The Wilderness Society has been working with communities and the Forest Service on just such a plan, but this new legislation would undermine it, along with the ancient forest.
Sincerely,
Kathy Kilmer
The Wilderness Society

P.S. We’re working hard to stop Sealaska’s assault on the best of the remaining old-growth in the Tongass. Please donate by March 17 to protect this stunningly beautiful rainforest! Make your gift today!

2 thoughts on “Hands off America’s rainforest!”

  1. Sealaska, the indigenous caretakers – of THEIR indigenous land, have over 20,000 shareholders who provide a checks and balance for the corporation. Native American’s do not want their land to be taken care of in a harmful manner. It is their lifeblood. Sealaska is made up of these indigenous caretakers and they will look out for their own land better than the Wilderness Society could.

    Have you ever asked Sealaska if they planted any new healthy trees? Trees Sealaska had begun replanting in 1982 grew to fifty feet tall and eight inches thick, and about 150,000 seedlings would be planted on 1,000 acres in the following year.

    Sealaska does not hatchet the Circle of Life – they help complete it. Trees left to disease or beetle infestation are targets for great uncontrollable forest fires. Responsible land management is expected from Sealaska and they live up to their responsibility.

    The Forest Services says, “Forest management can be consistent with wildlife objectives. There are especially bright prospects for partial cutting on the Tongass. Managing for a mosaic of forest patches has been suggested for deer in southeast Alaska. In addition, recent work suggests that certain types of partial cutting conserves deer habitat and old-growth structure, while maintaining the health of the forest.”

    Lets understand Sealaska’s natural green disposition before jumping to conclusions. Sealaska is looking out for the generations of the future and so you can trust they will manage their land with that in mind. As stated, the land is the life blood of the Tlingit, Haida and Tshimshian people….so Sierra Club you should sleep like a baby tonight.

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